Yeesookyung


Yeesookyung

Artist statement


I was reading Mark Fisher’s book Weird and Eerie and Lovecraft’s horror fictions just before the pandemic. I think it deepened all the fear that I’ve already had before. Even more, during social distance, the books that I read such as C. G. Jung’s The Secret of Golden Flower, which is introducing an esoteric guide to Taoist meditation techniques, and The Book of Revelations of St. John made me understand my fear more in detail. This crisis has reconstructed my relationship with fear. I am more into working with my own personal feelings that I went through during this crisis. For my Daily Drawing series, I started to make drawings using both hands simultaneously.


Yeesookyung, born 1968, Seoul, South Korea

daily drawing 030120, 2020,
colored pencil on paper, 11.8 x 11.8 in (30 x 30 cm)
Courtesy of the artist ⓒYeesookyung


Yeesookyung, born 1968, Seoul, South Korea

daily drawing 030520-1, 2020,
colored pencil on paper, 11.8 x 11.8 in (30 x 30 cm)
Courtesy of the artist ⓒYeesookyung


Yeesookyung, born 1968, Seoul, South Korea

daily drawing 030620, 2020,
colored pencil on paper, 11.8 x 11.8 in (30 x 30 cm)
Courtesy of the artist ⓒYeesookyung


Yeesookyung, born 1968, Seoul, South Korea

daily drawing 030820, 2020,
colored pencil on paper, 11.8 x 11.8 in (30 x 30 cm)
Courtesy of the artist ⓒYeesookyung


Yeesookyung, born 1968, Seoul, South Korea

daily drawing 031020, 2020,
colored pencil on paper, 11.8 x 11.8 in (30 x 30 cm)
Courtesy of the artist ⓒYeesookyung


Yeesookyung, born 1968, Seoul, South Korea

daily drawing 031420, 2020,
colored pencil on paper, 11.8 x 11.8 in (30 x 30 cm)
Courtesy of the artist ⓒYeesookyung


Yeesookyung, born 1968, Seoul, South Korea

daily drawing 031620, 2020, 2020,
colored pencil on paper, 11.8 x 11.8 in (30 x 30 cm)
Courtesy of the artist ⓒYeesookyung


Artist bio


Yeesookyung currently lives and works in Seoul, South Korea. She completed both her BFA (1987) and MFA (1989) in painting from Seoul National University. In 2010, she participated in a short-term residency in printmaking at KU’s Department of Visual Arts where she created two flags that were based on interactions with sororities and fraternities at the University. Her large conceptual sculpture Translated Vase is a familiar artwork in the Museum’s collection and was selected as the 2020 KU Common Work of Art.